Tuna on Trip

This above all: to thine own self be true.
jonyiveredesignsthings:

Jony Ive redesigns Korean flag.
Credit Sangho Lee in daramghaus

jonyiveredesignsthings:

Jony Ive redesigns Korean flag.

Credit Sangho Lee in daramghaus

natmastafunk:

It’s time

Need this in my kitchen.

natmastafunk:

It’s time

Need this in my kitchen.

(via thefuuuucomics)

Kyoto, you’re so lovely.

Kyoto, you’re so lovely.

this-is-a-good-idea:

an-australasian-writer:

simple solutions motherfuckers

THE LAST ONE

(via thefuuuucomics)

"

  • Questioning, which allows innovators to challenge the status quo and consider new possibilities.
  • Observing, which helps innovators detect small behavioral details — in the activities of customers, suppliers, and other companies – that suggest new ways of doing things.
  • Networking, which permits innovators to gain radically different perspectives from individuals with diverse backgrounds.
  • Experimenting, which prompts innovators to relentlessly try out new experiences, take things apart, and test new ideas.
  • Associational Thinking, drawing connections between questions, problems, or ideas from unrelated fields, which is triggered by questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting and is the catalyst for creativity.
"

The 5 traits of successful innovators, according to research from the Harvard Business School.

For the second point, learn how to master the art of observation.

For the last, don’t forget the hallmark of creativity:

It is the ability to spot the potential in the product of connecting things that don’t ordinarily go together that marks out the person who is truly creative.

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=IhkKmFlRS8XhKXmXD_yB7Q&u=/watch?v=HhabgvIIXik&feature=share

smartgirlsattheparty:

explore-blog:

Five great mathematicians and their contributions, in minimalist posters – the best thing since those minimalist posters celebrating pioneering women in science and philosophy’s major movements distilled in minimalist graphics.

Pair with 17 equations that changed the world

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

Now these are something to hang in a kids room.

(Source: explore-blog)

jtotheizzoe:

via chels:

This TED ED video is a great little primer on electrons and where they actually are within an atom. The other week when I got all confused about the electrons in palladium, I asked a chemist and a physicist to explain what I was missing. And they both did a fine job, but it’s nice to see the answers here in adorably animated form, and to really revel in their meaning.

"How electrons from one atom interact with electrons from another determines almost everything…From plain old rocks to the beautiful complexity of life, the nature of everything we see, hear, smell, taste, touch, and even feel is determined at the atomic level.” 

Man, I love chemistry. 

Electrons really don’t get a fair shake when it comes to science class. We spend so much time saying that they do this, and look like that, only to surprise people when they get to college:

"Just kidding! All of that was just the kid version! Because quantum physics!"

This TED-Ed video does it right. While we may be taught to look at orbitals as planetary orbits that are filled in an orderly fashion from one end of the periodic table to the other, real electrons are known to act like the very definition of wave/particle duality, a fuzzy cloud of quantumy-wantumy stuff.

In short, watch this lesson and you’ll never look at an orbital the same way again. You’ll look at it in a more beautiful and satisfying way than ever before. And hopefully with just the right amount of awe.

Follow it up with TED-Ed’s look at just how small an atom really is (HINT: Small enough to make your head explode)

PS - I love chemistry, too, Chels. 

smartgirlsattheparty:

fuckyeah-nerdery:

Malala Yousafzai is a way better person that I can ever hope to be.

This young woman is amazing. 

(Source: stupidfuckingquestions)